1 Blessed is he that wisely doth
the poor man’s case consider;
For when the time of trouble is,
the Lord will him deliver.

2 God will him keep, yea, save alive;
on earth he blessed shall live;
And to his enemies’ desire
thou wilt him not up give.

3 God will give strength when he on bed
of languishing doth mourn;
And in his sickness sore, O Lord,
thou all his bed wilt turn.

4 I said, O Lord, do thou extend
thy mercy unto me;
O do thou heal my soul; for why?
I have offended thee.

5 Those that to me are enemies,
of me do evil say,
When shall he die, that so his name
may perish quite away?

6 To see me if he comes, he speaks
vain words: but then his heart
Heaps mischief to it, which he tells,
when forth he doth depart.

7 My haters jointly whispering,
‘gainst me my hurt devise.
8 Mischief, say they, cleaves fast to him;
he li’th, and shall not rise.

9 Yea, ev’n mine own familiar friend,
on whom I did rely,
Who ate my bread, ev’n he his heel
against me lifted high.

10 But, Lord, be merciful to me,
and up again me raise,
That I may justly them requite
according to their ways.

11 By this I know that certainly
I favored am by thee;
Because my hateful enemy
triumphs not over me.

12 But as for me, thou me uphold’st
in mine integrity;
And me before thy countenance
thou sett’st continually.

13 The Lord, the God of Israel,
be blessed for ever then,
From age to age eternally.
Amen, yea, and amen.

To the chief Musician,
A Psalm of David.

This psalm contains, (1.) A representation of the blessedness of him who wisely considereth the case of the poor, and affords them relief, ver. 1-3. (2.) David’s candid acknowledgments of the justness of his affliction, and earnest supplications for a merciful deliverance, ver. 4. (3.) His sad complaints of the malicious, censorious, and spiteful reflections, and of the insolent carriage of his enemies, ver. 5-9. (4.) His hearty committing of his case and way to God, in the assured and triumphant faith of his favour, ver. 10-13.

While I sing, let mine eyes be toward the Lord Jesus, who thought on me in my low estate. Let me consider him, who, though he was rich, yet for our sakes became poor, that we through his poverty might be made rich ­ Jesus, who had not where to lay his head; Jesus whom his own disciple betrayed; and who through manifold enemies and much tribulation, entered into the kingdom of God!